Mountain Equipment Co-op Questions And Answers

Looking for Answers about Gibbon Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline?

Shop now at MEC
or
Choose a Category
Most Recent Questions
Recent Question:
Is it a 1" or 2" slackline?
Recent Question:
Does this product work with static ropes as well?
Recent Question:
Does this kit include everything you need to start slacklining? Will I need extra webbing/ slings to go around trees, attach to ratchets etc?
Recent Question:
Ideal for backing up a solo TR system?
Recent Question:
What is the limit of tension that can be set?
Questions with Most Recent Answers
Question:
Is it a 1" or 2" slackline?
Question:
Does this product work with static ropes as well?
Question:
Does this kit include everything you need to start slacklining? Will I need extra webbing/ slings to go around trees, attach to ratchets etc?
Question:
Ideal for backing up a solo TR system?
Question:
What is the limit of tension that can be set?

Customer Questions & Answers for
Gibbon Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline

The wide webbing makes it easier for beginners to start walking the line, and for advanced slackers to perform more dynamic moves.
Customer Questions & Answers:
8 Questions
 | 
14 Answers
Overall Rating:
4.1 out of 5
4.1
out of
5
Product Details

Questions & Answers for Gibbon Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline

Question

Where does one start as a beginner slackliner?

I need a website that explains the basics; what kinds of lines there are, how they differ, what's good for a beginner, etc. Any suggestions?
asked 3 years, 7 months ago
by
Yukie
 - Whitehorse YT
on Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline
3 answers
Answers
answer 1
This is a good website with lots of information on slacklining!
http://www.slacklining.ca/
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
by
Anonymous
answer 2
http://www.youtube.com/user/GibbonSlacklinesUSA

Gibbon has a bunch of great videos.
Best Answer
MEC MEMBER
MEC MEMBER
answered 3 years, 4 months ago
by
HanZzolo
 - Calgary, AB
answer 3
Here's a good one:

http://www.slackline.com

Theres great information here if you click around a bit and explore the site.

a few google searches will give you an enormous amount of set-up options and useful info.
Expert Answer
MEC MEMBER
MEC MEMBER
answered 3 years, 7 months ago
by
effie
 - squamish, bc
Question

Alternatives?

Can you use trucking straps? It half the price, the same width, and higher tonnage.
asked 4 years, 6 months ago
by
BK
 - Ontario
on Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
Trucking straps are way harder to use and not optimized for different tree diameters (the ratchet end will only have enough length to be mounted on small trees). Spend the extra money. Its worth every penny.
answered 3 years, 1 month ago
by
climbingbigman
 - Winnipeg, MB
answer 2
You could likely use trucking traps although I haven't in the past. It would come down to how hard the system would be to set up and level of comfort walking barefoot (for balance) on the line. Something I've done in the past is used carabiners and some of the 1" Tubular Webbing (5020-829) to make my own system. Doing it that way or with the trucking straps you would need to be shown how to set it up and practise a bit. The appeal to the Gibbon Slacklines Classic system is is the simplicity and ease of use if you have no experience or access on how to set up a slackline.
STAFF ANSWER
STAFF ANSWER
Expert Answer
answered 4 years, 5 months ago
by
Ansil
 - Vancouver
Question

high-lining?

weird question, say i buy this, somehow learn very fast and want to go high lining. could i safely use this product? or what would i be looking for? just curious how much of a difference in lines there is
 
Products related to my question
 
asked 3 years, 3 months ago
by
Anonymous
on Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
Hello,

If you are new to slacklining, I would recommend talking to the folks at Slackline Ottawa. They will guide you in the right direction. WWW.facebook.com/slacklineottawa

it is much easier to learn with people who already do it.

See you there!
answered 2 years, 4 months ago
by
Anonymous
answer 2
No, it is not recommend and could be potentially dangerous to use the Gibbon Slacklines for high lining. The main reason is that it uses a ratchet to tighten the slackline and this piece is not rated for climbing or anything else that matter. A big problem of highlining is that the main line needs to be tensioned significantly higher due to the typically longer lines used and any resulting falls will place even more forces across it. Some hignliners use a triple redundancy system of 2 webbing pieces (often stronger polyesters or beefed up nylons) with a static rope or Amsteel Blue line inside each other for maximum strength and follow the climbing SERENE (Solid, Efficient, Redundant, Equalized, No Extension) acronym to ensure that the highline's anchor points are fully secured.

"Technically" you could use this to high line but it would require a secondary rated backup line in case of your main high line fails. In the end, it just not worth it.

There's plenty of resources online that you can find more information on highlining. Below is one such example.
- http://www.slacklineexpress.com/hig...
STAFF ANSWER
STAFF ANSWER
Expert Answer
answered 3 years, 3 months ago
by
Champagne
 - MEC Service Centre
Question

What is the difference between the different types of slacklines??(jibline, surfline...)

asked 2 years, 7 months ago
by
Anonymous
on Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
as far as gibbon lines go,
these are two inch wide lines:
the classic line is static to prevent too much movement.
the jib line is a bouncier line for tricks.
the surfline is the same but in double the length (98ft).
then there are one inch wide lines:
flowline is similar to classic but one inch.
tubeline is a tubular, softer feeling line.
and proline is a threaded tubular line.
MEC MEMBER
MEC MEMBER
answered 2 years ago
by
robjloranger
 - victoria, bc
answer 2
The jibline is intended for "jibbing", jumps and tricks. The Classic is intended for more or less all-round use.
answered 2 years, 7 months ago
by
Anonymous
Question

weight limit

is there a maximum weight limit for the persons on the line? i have seen two people on lines and was wondering if there are limits.
asked 2 years ago
by
robjloranger
 - victoria, bc
on Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline
2 answers
Answers
answer 1
i have found the answer, and it is not 4 tons. that is the maximum tensile load, not the maximum weight applied to the line under load. if the line is 49ft and the sag at the center (with the person standing still) is 1ft and that person weighed 250lbs the tensile load would be around 2800lbs. this does not account for bouncing or tricking, which applies further tensile load. also setting up with a tighter line would create more tensile load as well, if the above set up was tightened to instead have 6 inches of sag the tensile load would become 5600lbs. so in short, the load limit is 4ton but the user weight limit depends on how much slack you have in the line. search for slack line tension calculator. hope that helps anyone else interested.
Best Answer
MEC MEMBER
MEC MEMBER
answered 2 years ago
by
robjloranger
 - victoria, bc
answer 2
The max weight is 4 tons. I would hope two people would not weigh more 4 tons.
STAFF ANSWER
STAFF ANSWER
Expert Answer
answered 2 years ago
by
TeaBow
 - MEC Service Centre
Question

Gibbon Classic Ratchet with 1" tubular webbing

Can the ratchet that comes with the Gibbon Classic kit be used with 1" tubular webbing? Please note that the slackline in the kit is a 2" flat slackline.
asked 2 years, 1 month ago
by
Anonymous
on Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
The 2” ratchet will not safely secure the 1” webbing.
STAFF ANSWER
STAFF ANSWER
Expert Answer
answered 2 years, 1 month ago
by
TeaBow
 - MEC Service Centre
Question

Easy take down

Just wondering about if it's an easy up and easy take down as the location I can put it would require it to come down often.

Thank you
asked 2 years ago
by
Anonymous
on Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
It does take more strength to take down the line, then to set up. When my line was new it was harder, and took longer to take down. But once I wore it in a bit it took way less time.

Overall it shouldn't take longer then 5 minutes to set up and take down.
STAFF ANSWER
STAFF ANSWER
Expert Answer
answered 2 years ago
by
TeaBow
 - MEC Service Centre
Question

Is the 15m slack line a good length and able to be strung up between most trees or is the 25m a better option?

 
Products related to my question
 
asked 1 year, 8 months ago
by
Anonymous
on Gibbon Classic 15m/49 ft Slackline
1 answer
Answers
answer 1
Using a 15m (or 49') is very common practice among slackliners, although if you plan on attaching it around huge sequoias or redwoods, you want to go for a 25m (and even then...).

On a side note, you may be interested in pads as well, to help protect the trees that help you enjoy your line!
 
Products from my answer
 
STAFF ANSWER
STAFF ANSWER
answered 1 year, 8 months ago
by
Jungfrau